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larlev

Backpack to lumbar pack

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Did it take you guys a few rides to get used to these? I went out on a little neighborhood ride loaded up with water and tools. Pretty damn uncomfortable on my lower back. Hoping it's just one of those things that takes a bit getting used to. Guess a backpack wasnt that comfortable at first.

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I recently picked up a Seral as well. Still getting used to it, but have had no lower back pain. From what I understand Osprey's waist packs are designed to ride in the lumbar region, above the hips. Higher than normal belt height.

One of the adjustments for me to learn is getting the belt tight enough, then loosening it when I want to spin it around to get some goody out. The two pulls for tightening make it easy to snug up when done. It should become second nature eventually and I'm really liking the ease of access to stuff.

Another adjustment I made was to put a small pack on the top tube / steer tube area and it now contains a spare tube, levers, patch kit and I may put a folding tool set in there though it is getting crowded. This reduces the number of things I need to move back and forth from fanny pack to backpack, as well as takes some of the heavier things out of the fanny pack.

So far I'm pleased with the experiment and the more I ride with it the better I like it. I keep the Raptor handy for longer rides, and may need it more for Summer as the 1.5L in the Seral won't last long once the temps get up to broiling.

Also, I hung a carabiner on it that the handle of my Fiskar's 15" Loppers fits just about perfectly, but have yet to try this in the field.

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I switched from a minimal backpack with 3L water and room for tools/tube to a minimal hip(ster) pack with room for tools and 1 water bottle. I purposely wanted a hip pack without a bladder. I figure if I am out and I need more than 3 water bottles (2 on bike and 1 on me) then I'll bring the backpack. For me it was a quick transition and I like it a lot. I could imagine if I weighed it down alot then I might agree with you.

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Posted (edited)

I have the camelbak Palos and it definitely took some getting used to; however, I’ll never go back to a backpack unless absolutely necessary (rare for me). 

Loosening during rides was an issue for me in the beginning but then I bought the strap holder deals (sorry can’t remember name) and it stays nice and secure now. 

I carry 50oz water in bladder, pump, tube, patch kit, multitool, levers, and a snack. Sooo glad to get those damn straps off my shoulders and the pack off my back. Admittedly, I do have to adjust it slightly (just hiking up the position while riding) several times a ride but, for me, it has become second nature and the benefit outweighs any cons. 

Edited by Morealice
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Posted (edited)

mtbr.com has a review of various lumbar packs:  Top 7 Best Hip Packs  They included the Henty 3.0, which has some shoulder suspension,  like a WingNut. 

The EVOC Hip Pack Pro 3L can carry a small bladder and two tall water bottles and looks promising.  I like the voluminous side pockets.  mtbr.com has more photos, and an extended review with video here.  I may give it a try, if I can find one in a local store.  Do any LBS' carry EVOC brand?

I tried an Osprey lumbar pack and had to return it to REI; it just didn't sit right on my back. 

 

Edited by June Bug

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I've been riding for the past few months with a water bottle on the frame, a Back Bottle in my jersey pocket, and various ways to carry spare bits and phone. I settled on a REI Trail 2 waistpack for carrying spare bits and phone. This was fine for 2-3 hours in moderate heat, especially if I can find a water fountain on my route.

on Sunday, it got quite hot and humid, so I went back to my Osprey Rapor 10 with the 3L bladder 2/3 full. man, that sucked! I really hate the weight and awkwardness of the backpack. I need to get a second water bottle on my bike to avoid that for most of my rides now, or try a lumbar pack that carries water. my frame has two places to mount a water bottle, but one is under the downtube where it's sure to get splattered with dog shit.

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I have an Ergon pack for big rides, have an old Camelback MULE, and just got an Raptor 10.  I love the Raptor 10 but I avoid it if I have to.  Recently, my addition of the dropper post meant I couldn't use my saddle bag or Backcountry race strap, so I'd started using the backpack more to carry my stuff.  That's fine for 3 hour rides, but too much for 1-2 hour rides.  I just picked up a Backcountry Research Mutherload frame strap and I love it.  I also will carry a bottle in my back jersey pocket if I need extra water on my FS (it has a 2nd bottle mount on the outside of the DT but I have not put a cage on it).  On my hardtail, I have two bottle mounts so that's less of an issue.  I can't see myself getting a small hip pack because it won't be useful in long rides, and I will not (don't want to) wear it for short rides.

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On 3/14/2019 at 4:44 PM, larlev said:

Did it take you guys a few rides to get used to these? I went out on a little neighborhood ride loaded up with water and tools. Pretty damn uncomfortable on my lower back. Hoping it's just one of those things that takes a bit getting used to. Guess a backpack wasnt that comfortable at first.

There is a sweet spot for me I have found. Too high and it bothers my back and too low it flops too much. Losing some weight also made it feel better for me, but idk if that is problem for you.

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Posted (edited)

My backpack has a hip belt and I adjust it so the weight is on my hips the shoulder straps are loose. the chest strap keeps the back from flopping around. I would think a hip pack would pretty much be the same.

 

I like the back protection that the backpack gives. 

Edited by crazyt

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I find my hip pack to be superior when carving the gnar on my 1 wheel as it adds to my already sufficient low center of gravity.

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Ive ridden with the lumbar a few times. It's not bad now. I did play around with position and seems to be ok on lower back now. 

Still prefer backpack though. The Raptor 10 firs really nice compared to my old hydrapak

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I didn't realize that Wingnut packs are still around, but yes, yes they are.  They are a Camelbak/pack de derrière mashup, with a recent enduro design with more storage space.  

wingnutgear.com/

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Love my Dakine Hot Laps. Just take a little acclimation, then you'll wonder why you didn't do it sooner. I definitely prefer it tight and have adjust as I consumer the water, this keeps it pretty much 'invisible' to me. 

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Thought it was backpack season already with the temps rising last week. So, I opted to ride 15 miles at RHR with the 3 liter jug in the Osprey Raptor backpack. Got done and found I had only drank about a liter.

Back to the 1.5 liter Seral waist pack next time, with half the water weight penalty and no sweaty back coverage.

Still, choice is better than no choice and they both are kept in the van whenever I'm off to the trails.

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I finally ended up with the Palos. The just never rode right on me. Once a certain someone explained about the smaller adjust straps on each side were for, I actually like it now.

Because my shoulder is beyond hope, I'll never be able to go back to a backpack style anyway.

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I got some birthday gift cards burning a hole in my pocket and thinking about picking up a hip pack. I wouldn't say I've "narrowed it down to these" because that would imply that I actually crossed a few off the list. I have one cage in the frame in addition to the bladder, but I do tend to drink more than most other people on a ride it seems.

Dakine Hot Laps 5L - 70oz bladder which is a plus for me because you can carry 50oz in a 70oz bladder, but not the way around. It's also the cheapest at $70, but no side pockets for easy sn'access.

Camelbak Repack - 50oz and the storage seems well thought out. - $75

Osprey Seral - 50oz like the Camelbak, but a little nicer quality. $85

EVOC - 50oz bladder plus the ability to carry 2 bottles. Seems like overkill to have a bladder and 2 bottles (plus one on the frame), but if I love the hip pack, it would be nice to have it as an option for long rides too. A $120 or $100 if I get the ugliest color.

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Go to REI and try on a pack. Ask to borrow some of the beanbag weights they keep in the backpacking section and load up the pack to see how it fits.

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I run the Osprey Savu with 2 bottles. Small 10oz bottles for short rides, and larger 20oz bottles for longer rides. Can also pull the bottles out and tuck in the bottle holders for a standard hip pack. No complaints here. Think I caught it on sale on Amazon for $39.95. Great bargain at that price. 

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I've been using the Dakine for about a year now. Camo one so you cant spot me.
What I like about the pack is the bladder is seperate from the main pocket. So I can easily access and fill or remove.
Nice pockets inside the main zipper area. Expandable. The bladder is made by the same company who makes them for Osprey , so quality. Also the bladder has a baffle in the center so the liquid doesnt slosh side to side like other products do.


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

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On 10/2/2019 at 12:49 PM, Cafeend said:

I've been using the Dakine for about a year now. Camo one so you cant spot me.
What I like about the pack is the bladder is seperate from the main pocket. So I can easily access and fill or remove.
Nice pockets inside the main zipper area. Expandable. The bladder is made by the same company who makes them for Osprey , so quality. Also the bladder has a baffle in the center so the liquid doesnt slosh side to side like other products do.


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

I got a Dakine as well.  I hated the bladder.  super-thin material, and I couldn't get the bite valve to work comfortably.  swapped out the bladder for a Camelbak one of about the same size.  I apparently also hate the new Camelbak bite valves, but fortunately had an extra old school one laying around.  Frankenbladder.

my only remaining complaint is condensation if I put ice in it.  don't have that problem with my Blowfish backpack.  but I guess if I'm just doing 'hot laps', I don't need ice water.   I'll just get one of my groupies on the tour bus to fix me a frosty beverage between laps.

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