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AustinBike

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AustinBike last won the day on May 7

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  1. I know exactly where that is. The sucky part was that they did not move it, they just busted it up.
  2. Yes, do not get anything under a 14 based on the satellite capability of the 14 and beyond for satellite communication.
  3. Yeah, that was an excellent article for cutting through the hype. It really boils down to the use cases. Hoss is out doing the Tour Divide so relying on a phone is a fool's errand, he needs a dedicated unit like a Garmin. I will be doing the occasional jaunt outside of cell coverage, so a phone would be perfect for me. The portable GPS market is like the camera market. For years, when I would travel the world, I carried a point and shoot camera. Then smartphones came out, but the camera still took better pictures. When the smartphone's capability surpassed the point and shoot camera capability, I ditched the camera, carrying one less device. But plenty of people still use cameras today, but their needs surpass mine, which are pretty basic. GPS units will go the same way. I believe the market for individual devices will shrink, *a bit* because the number of people that owned them that did not need the full power of one of those dedicated devices is probably pretty small. It's not the cost of the device, it's the monthly service that kills it. You can justify spending $350 to make sure you are always safe, but when they stick their hand out and ask for another $10-20 month for that, you start looking at how often you actually use it. I believe the real use case is a rugged device and the service plan is initiated by the device. You pay your $350 and you are done, until you need it. Activating it out on the trail has a $40-50 monthly cost, but it is a pay as you go. If you are stranded or injured, $50 is nominal, you'll pay it in a heartbeat. And then if the device sits around for the next 11 months, you're fine. However, I do not believe that a business model like that is tenable, I think you need a more regular revenue stream, even if it is smaller. It is really difficult to manage a spiky revenue stream.
  4. Interesting product. I chose a Garmin 840 but did not go with the solar option because it did not seem to add much time to the battery vs. the drawback of the solar panel being the screen. That left the solar versions with a much harder screen to read. I'd take the bigger size to get the solar function without compromising the screen. I am skeptical of the dial, it looks like something that could get hit a lot in mountain biking. I think this would be one to look into in the future when my 840 is near the end.
  5. Just found out that the beta iOS 18 device will only send satellite messages to another iPhone that is also running iOS 18 so that is a bridge too far for this summer California trip. There is no way I want both of our phones on beta software with 3 days on the road each way.
  6. We were there doing trail work to clear out the area along the maintenance shed and the rock bridge. Ended up getting pretty wet and muddy.
  7. Yes, I saw this the other day and was pretty excited about it. I figured it was coming eventually. The only down side is that it will not be available until the fall and I have a month-long trip to CA where I will be in the mountains a bunch in places with no signal. I am not that confident about running a beta OS to get that functionality but that may be my best choice. It's quite a sliding scale. On one hand I could have satellite connectivity for my phone, but on the other hand I have to weigh that against phone problems on the trip. I'll be watching the beta forums to see how the service is working and then make the call before heading out.
  8. Ah, twitter, come for the discussions, stay for the nazis!
  9. I rented one once. Let's just say that it can hold its own against a deer.
  10. YouTube has saved me hundreds in refrigerator repairs. Now that I am mostly retired, I'm willing to try a lot of things because I have the time to putter around with them. Since I still do a little bit of consulting, I know what my "per hour" rate is so I can judge that against the amount of time and effort to get someone out to do things for us. I still find that, despite having a decent bike workshop in the garage, I still take my FS to Bicycle House for anything suspension related. Or anything requiring me to remove the crankset because a.) it is impossible to get off even with a breaker bar and b.) DUB sucks. My next bike will definitely not have a press fit bottom bracket, that is the devil.
  11. I just saw this on MTBR: This is an interesting take. I had not considered the "finesse" that you can get from a bike that is just not present with an e-bike. So much of my riding over the years has become much more about feeling the bike through tight obstacles, rock gardens, etc. My Orbea Occam is exceptionally adept at helping me finesse my way through features, to the point where I often tell people to give me a little space because I have the ability to slow a climb to insanely low speed to slips through the appropriate line instead of just getting a head of steam and trying to power up something. The singlespeed really taught me this skill but the Occam lets me literally track stand in the middle of a climb or a rock garden and sneak through with the least effort.
  12. We used Klock Electric in Austin when we had a lightning strike to fix some issues in the house, they were fast, did good work, and as I recall, pretty reasonably priced. Also, Mark Bedell who posted on the old Mojo site as "silverback" is an electrician: https://www.facebook.com/mark.bedell1/ I think he works for a solar company these days so I don't know if he is in the service market but if you are friends with him you may want to reach out to him.
  13. They pulled the mask off and it was poison ivy. And he would have gotten away with it if it wasn't for those meddling kids.
  14. Well, not to be the downer, but we live in a state where 95% of the land is privately owned. Sadly, this is going to happen. Property owners can do whatever they want with their property and allowing a high risk activity like biking is rarely in the cards.
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