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Milton Reimer's Ranch Trail Conditions

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Although Reimers was open to mountain biking today, I would avoid this trail system for a good couple of days. It's wet in many places, with deep ruts, and riding will only damage it further. In addition, the extensive rainfall has allowed grassland features to flow over the trail - meaning that you can't see where you are going.

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It is slower to open than other local trails. You can check if the mountain bike trails are open on their website:

https://parks.traviscountytx.gov/parks/reimers-ranch?fbclid=IwAR3IEGoMIZg10S9AzIgezCUrA2pVkqsIhzS9ZFJgGm_706HQHVRzcQ8752A

The 411 on Reimers:

-30 minute drive from The Y in Oakhill

-$5 per person to get in

-Approximately 18 miles of single track AND 18 miles of scenic double track. All of it has very good trail signage now.

-The single track looks confusing on Strava, but it is very easy to see how the trail system was laid out once you start to use it. Very hard to get lost, just keep on going. There are very well labeled green, blue, and black trails. Don't be scared of the black trails. There might be a few challenging features here and there but 90% of both black segments can be ridden by just about any rider. It's possible to ride all of the 18 miles of single track in one long segment without repeating much.

-Very scenic. Lots of photo opportunities out on the trail.

-All the single track is one direction. Never worry about head-ons there.

-The Flow Trails Area features big machine built features utilizing 140 feet of drop. Very different from anything else in the area. Take Milton's Shortcut from the bottom to do multiple runs. Most of the features have at least two lines to them, some have three. You don't have to leave the ground to enjoy this trail. Do it multiple ways. Fast on the ground, or taking air at every chance.

-Practice your jumps on the "13 Jumps" jump line. It is four groups of 4 or 3 small jumps to get anyone comfortable in the air. It is on the "Fenceline" segment. The jump line is mere feet to the right of the established trail tread.

-Swim in the Perdernales River after your ride.

-Hike Climber's Canyon to see a Jurrasic Park type environment. Ferns and springs. Very interesting.

-Ride out from the single track area to find one of the two Pogue Spring Canyon overlooks. It's not the Grand Canyon, but it is impressive for being "right there." Bonus jumps: there are three big water bars (humps in the road) on the jeep road just east of Fenceline that are fun hitting at speed.

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On 3/8/2021 at 10:04 AM, The Tip said:

It is slower to open than other local trails. You can check if the mountain bike trails are open on their website:

https://parks.traviscountytx.gov/parks/reimers-ranch?fbclid=IwAR3IEGoMIZg10S9AzIgezCUrA2pVkqsIhzS9ZFJgGm_706HQHVRzcQ8752A

The 411 on Reimers:

I missed a LOT of this stuff the last time I was there. it seemed like the big multi-use loop is pretty tame, maybe newb/gravel bike rideable?
i missed the jumps on Fenceline!

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looks like I am heading to Reimer's this weekend. the trails are well marked and mapped. Anyone have an informed opinion on the best order to ride everything, or most of everything? the flow trail is fun but it's not my favorite thing, so that might be the last thing I want to ride for the day.

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I ride the three marked race loops on the parking lot side - if it gets hot you can skip any of them using the trail which runs along the peak of the hill - then I ride what used to be an extra credit loop, going thru the gate at the top. That's also where you can divert and climb to the flow trail, if you want. Then I follow the trail over to the back side of the hill, which includes the rock garden section, and that takes you back over the hill to the big downhill. If you don't want to ride the 'meadow', which is several miles and rather boring, turn left onto the double track when you pass the gate.

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I like to start with a short warm-up on the green trails. Then I loop back to the start and (after a dozen runs on the wooden pump track), I head into the blue and black trails, making sure I get them all and try not to get distracted with that middle trail that cuts between them. I finish up the blue trails with the northern most singletrack (Jen's Loop on TrailForks), and then hit Fenceline headed west. This routes me back into the green trails for an easy spin to end things. Now you're back at the lot wondering if you need to hit all the black trails backwards or go hit the Flow trail. And of course you should do both. 

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49 minutes ago, TAF said:

If you don't want to ride the 'meadow', which is several miles and rather boring

So far as open meadow type trails go (which I don't usually enjoy), I actually find this one kind of fun. There are enough big turns and little g-outs to keep it interesting if you hit it fast enough. And it was supper fun the one time I did it on my gravel bike.

Edited by Barry
To change stuff from stupid auto correct
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some of the maps show that most of the trail are "directional." is that a suggestion or should I stick to the prescribed direction?

 

Here's a route I had in mind. at the end, one could ride all around Henne, and or Ride Kent's, or turn off toward the Flow trail, or do all of it.

https://www.trailforks.com/ridelog/planner/view/268788/

Edited by mack_turtle
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1 hour ago, mack_turtle said:

some of the maps show that most of the trail are "directional." is that a suggestion or should I stick to the prescribed direction?

 

Here's a route I had in mind. at the end, one could ride all around Henne, and or Ride Kent's, or turn off toward the Flow trail, or do all of it.

https://www.trailforks.com/ridelog/planner/view/268778/

I don't know that it's strictly directional, but the trail signage does point you in a specific direction, and I don't know that I'd ride it any other way. I for sure wouldn't want to meet someone flying down the downhills while I was riding up one. 

What day do you plan to go out there -- maybe I'll come out too.

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There's a group ride of sorts planned Saturday Oct. 10, 9 am. I plan to follow (or lead) some folks on all the blue trail. that's a 7 mile route. at the end of that, some people can get some bonus miles in on the black trails and ride the Flow trail. 

Edited by mack_turtle
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39 minutes ago, mack_turtle said:

There's a group ride of sorts planned Monday Oct. 10, 9 am. I plan to follow (or lead) some folks on all the blue trail. that's a 7 mile route. at the end of that, some people can get some bonus miles in on the black trails and ride the Flow trail. 

Sunday, Oct 10 -- or Monday, Oct 11?

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All Reimers single track is directional. That is one of the appeals of the place. Even Greenway is directional and your route is going the wrong way on it.

Here's a ride where I pretty much did it all.

https://www.strava.com/activities/4896896756

I repeated  "13 Jumps," which is part of Fenceline, for two reasons. First because it's fun. Second to include Cardosa's Climb in my "do it all" routing. Fortunately Cardosa's Climb puts you at the top of 13 Jumps.

Here's the rest of the park's trails. These are mostly multi-use trails that are well suited for gravel bikes. Most all are bi-directional.

https://www.strava.com/activities/4909465930

And the Flow Trails area is not all about getting big air. There is a route down that keeps wheels on the ground the whole time. That elevation drop can be enjoyed in several different ways and by several different skill levels of bikers. Actually I could see a gravel bike having fun doing it.

The Travis County parks people are gung ho on mountain bikes. So refreshing to deal with a government entity that "gets it."

Edited by The Tip
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23 minutes ago, The Tip said:

All Reimers single track is directional.

Like I mentioned, I knew the Flow Trail was directional...but I can't find any information to confirm that the other trails there are directional. I haven't seen it at the park, nor can I find it online. I see arrows pointing, but that can just be used as a trail marker. Specifically directional trails need much more clear indicators, like a "wrong way" sign, a "do not enter" sign, or a "one way" sign. I dug though the park website, but wasn't able to find any indication of directional trails.  From where did you glean this information? 

 

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sorry for the confusion. looks like I am partially responsible for leading a ride this Sunday, Oct. 10 at 9 a.m. We'll ride the blue trails and when we reach the end of Cardosa's, it looks like we could do Fenceline again, ride Henne and Kent's, and/ or to to the Flow trail. I'll let everyone decide what they want to do at that point.

 

now that i've taken some time to really view that map, I want to get out there more. it's just a bit of a drive for me, and I don't know if I'll enjoy it when it's over 90°.

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Thanks for making me question my "opinion" about the park. Y'all are probably right. I guess I haven't learned a thing about Reimer's in the 60-70 hours of work I've done out there. The park employees I've worked with probably don't know anything either. (sheez) 

BUT SERIOUSLY, I just called the park to tell them there might be confusion on this topic. He said, "Really? But there's arrows on all the new signs! And "Do Not Enter" signs as well."

We decided that a more in your face notice will be put on the NEW COOL KIOSK that has just recently been installed at the mountain biking parking lot trail head that will more forcefully educate the public.

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regarding the route I had in mind, the first 1/2 mile on Greeway is going the wrong way to get to a blue trail — Sikeway  — because no one wants to ride miles and miles of green trail. seriously, I'll have a mutiny on my hands. what is the alternative, if any, to get to Sikeway? The rest of the route follows the "correct" direction. or does it? it's not on the Travis Country website, so they might as well tell us by telegram.

It would help if they would put the map with directions on the MRR website, but they only have a vague site map that does not have the mtb trails on it. they have the resources to do this. they could get volunteers to do it if nothing else. Is there a trail map on that site? if there is, it's not easy to find. this is the 21st century.

Edited by mack_turtle
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