Jump to content
IGNORED

Let's talk cranksets


Recommended Posts

I used to have problems with this crank and it was because I had too many spacers. Bought a BB tool while on vacation and got the bike back to riding. Everything was great for about a year.

Was riding my urban singlespeed the other day and this happened:

IMG_3649.thumb.jpeg.16ba9407fe8232f952bb6595f33dc31b.jpeg

 

 

Right now I have a cheap Amazon crank on my MTB SS, so I am thinking about pulling that and putting it on the urban bike, theoretically if there is ever a catastrophic failure I'd prefer that does not happen on the trail.

I'm looking at putting one of these on my MTB SS:

https://www.competitivecyclist.com/shimano-slx-fc-m7130-1x-crank-arms

Anyone have any opinions about cranks? Something I need to consider?

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Most of the time, I really like Shimano‘s way of installing their cranks from a durability standpoint but I will say the Sram method is way easier with a torque wrench. Minor thing I know, but never liked the process of torquing one and then flipping over to the other bolt and torquing it down. Proper torque is key with crank installs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One other thing to consider. Shimano changes their spindle length when swapping chain lines. So, if you have a non boost bike, you have to get a non-boost crankset. With SRAM they make one spindle length (well two for fat bikes) and adjust the chainline by the offset of their chainrings. This means that you can swap SRAM cranks from a non-boost bike to a boost bike or the other way around or even to the super boost bike. 6mm offset for non-boost, 3mm for boost, and 0 offset for super boost. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This would definitely be for a non-boost bike. Hadn't thought about that, will be sure to check it when I buy.

The thing I like about the Shimano is the mounting. I have had RaceFace on my bikes in the past and they always end up coming loose, even with Locktite on them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer the Shimano BB design with 24mm ID bearing on both sides but the hard stop when properly cranked down on SRAM is also nice. Raceface is a best of both. No goofy floating spindle in the drive side bearing and no fussy bearing preload. It helps to make sure your BB shell is faced. The Cinch-type direct mount rings are easy to source. I've been using Aeffect cranks with a Shimano BB for a few years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have seen this a number of times with shimanos latest crop of cranksets.  Bikes that have had one installed for over a year and then if falls off.  The Spec is 14Nm, but we started tightening higher to prevent them from falling off.  I even notice the prebuilt bikes coming from the manufactuers torqued beyond that.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, we’ve been seeing warranty claims on this as well.

Cane Creek uses the same mounting style for their eeWings as SRAM but the spline interface on the spindle is a hirth joint is pretty stout. I recommend just going with that. 😉

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How much problem has been seen with the RF Cinch? That came on my RIP9 in 2016 and has been trouble free ... I use torque wrench to spec, preload to no slop but not excessively snug, and I think I have had to change bearings once or twice only.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been using RF Aeffect cranks and I am confused about Cinch. The chainring interface is a "Cinch" direct-mount variety, but it seems like the threaded preload feature is also called Cinch. my crankset does not have this bearing preload feature and I don't see the need for it if the frame and BB are correctly installed. That means facong the BB shell so it's exactly the correct width. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Cinch is the combined designation of ring mount and BB/spindle interface. Seems like they made DUB really similar but i've not worked with a DUB crankset so i'm not sure.

FWIW I never had a big issue with the shimano style pinch-bolts, and they certainly are easier in some ways, but I think I like the single-bolt things a teeny bit more - as long as they're mounted correctly and to spec to do seem fine.

I've had a couple shimano style hollow-tech type cranksets that didn't work out long term, fewer issues with single-bolt systems - but i'm just one statistical sample point. :^)

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, bear said:

I think Cinch is the combined designation of ring mount and BB/spindle interface. Seems like they made DUB really similar but i've not worked with a DUB crankset so i'm not sure.

FWIW I never had a big issue with the shimano style pinch-bolts, and they certainly are easier in some ways, but I think I like the single-bolt things a teeny bit more - as long as they're mounted correctly and to spec to do seem fine.

I've had a couple shimano style hollow-tech type cranksets that didn't work out long term, fewer issues with single-bolt systems - but i'm just one statistical sample point. :^)

My experience on the single-bolt systems is that they tend to come loose no matter how much I crank it down or use loctite. Always on single speeds, always came loose on the trail. But now I am having that with a Shimano, so maybe it is me?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Been using RF cinch since 2015 on multiple bikes with no issues. They have never come loose, made noise and setup easily with threaded or PF BB. Also nice to adjust chainline with the ring rather than crank. The aeffect R (?) is machined and lighter than regular one. The arms on standard aeffect are same length they just drill the pedal hole in different spot.

Wouldn't buy a carbon RF crank though. Prefer sram carbon every time.

Edited by ATXZJ
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I prefer rf cinch mostly because I have a hard time with the preload and telling when the preload is right before tightening the crank bolts.  I use the little knurled plastic thingie.  Being able to tighten the cranks and adjusting preload separately is awesome.  With sram (XX) I have had to replace a bb because of it  ever being tight and also had to over tighten the cranks to take out the slack.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, ATXZJ said:

 

Wouldn't buy a carbon RF crank though. Prefer sram carbon every time.

100% this.  My new bike came with Next SL and I’m expecting they will fail at some point.  At least I’m the original owner so so should be able to get a replacement unlike the ones on my last bike (used) which had the pedal thread insert come loose.  My XX cranks had >10k miles with lots of CTX pedal strikes and obviously marred and they have a second life on someone else’s bike now.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...