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Chief

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Why the nylon washer?  It has 3x the coefficient of thermal expansion of aluminum.    I'd check that bolt before every ride to be sure, but I'm curious what a real ME like @RedRider3141 has to say.

Did the oil pan bolt come with an aluminum crush washer?  I have a pack of these if you'd like one.

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I usually plead the 5th when it comes to CF Frames. Way too many warranty issues/ OEMs doing a CYA. 

Ideally, assuming you are torqueing it the same, you'd want an AL washer with the same ID/OD as the broken bolt. This would ensure the loading on the CF frame would be equivalent. I'd also be careful with how much it sticks out that you don't hit/catch something, it could potentially transfer more load into the edge of the washer/frame if you catch it on a rock, etc.

Clarification needed: The Bolt (5) threads into and holds the Hanger (3/4)? And the Axle (1) threads into the hanger? So if you loose torque on the bolt (5), you loose part of your axle retention? If so, as an ME, we'd call that a "dumb" design.

Screen Shot 2021-06-23 at 6.03.13 AM.jpg

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The nylon washer was @mack_turtle's idea. My thought is that nylon on carbon is less likely to "break" the carbon than some bonewipe like me putting a big ass aluminum washer on there that digs into the frame when there is some cross flex from landing weird.

If the ME's think that having the aluminum washer against the frame is a better idea then I am all ears because I am not an engineer in the least.

There was a rubber gasket that came with the bolt. If ALU is the right call is it:

Carbon frame <> ALU washer <> Rubber gasket <> Bolt

And, yes, the the bolt holds the hanger to the frame.

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EDIT.

Re: Rubber Washer. You mean with the original Hanger Bolt or the Drain Bolt.

My point is that you should use whatever the original designer intended. If they allowed AL to CF contact then match their same contact patch and you should be fine. If they had a rubber or nylon washer then I would use it. 

Edited by RedRider3141
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My only concern is with how the nylon expands and contracts based on temperature, and whether it takes a set or not.  Normally I'm guessing the normal bolt stays put based on friction and doesn't need bolt stretch to hold it.  With the thick nylon washer, I'd be afraid of it taking a set or contracting and now the bolt will be loose.

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9 minutes ago, RedRider3141 said:

EDIT.

Re: Rubber Washer. You mean with the original Hanger Bolt or the Drain Bolt.

My point is that you should use whatever the original designer intended. If they allowed AL to CF contact then match their same contact patch and you should be fine. If they had a rubber or nylon washer then I would use it. 

The original spec was an aluminum bolt on the carbon frame. There was no washer. But the grade of aluminum on the original bolt was higher than the hardware store washer.

The rubber washer was on the drain bolt. 

And I put locktite on the bolt when I put it in. The original had locktite as well.

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Ok, no rubber then. Aluminum is "softer" than a steel bolt but the CF probably doesn't care. Its the surface area the load is spread out over, that's why the head of the bolt was so large relative to the shaft size. Even with a nylon washer, you are going to want to spread the load. The washer/ bolt contact should be the same size as the original bolt. 

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Has anyone had their DVO fork and/or shock serviced locally?

I'm way overdue for the 100 hour service on both (not just the lowers/air can service, but the complete rebuild of the dampers) and I'm trying to decide whether to send it to DVO. They are telling me 3-4 weeks plus shipping time, which would have me off the bike for a long time... I'm wondering if anyone can do this locally.

 

 

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1 hour ago, olddbrider said:

Has anyone had their DVO fork and/or shock serviced locally?

I'm way overdue for the 100 hour service on both (not just the lowers/air can service, but the complete rebuild of the dampers) and I'm trying to decide whether to send it to DVO. They are telling me 3-4 weeks plus shipping time, which would have me off the bike for a long time... I'm wondering if anyone can do this locally.

 

 

You may send @Chief a PM on this one. He's been using DVO products for a few years and pretty sure he does all the work himself.

 

 

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1 hour ago, olddbrider said:

Has anyone had their DVO fork and/or shock serviced locally?

I'm way overdue for the 100 hour service on both (not just the lowers/air can service, but the complete rebuild of the dampers) and I'm trying to decide whether to send it to DVO. They are telling me 3-4 weeks plus shipping time, which would have me off the bike for a long time... I'm wondering if anyone can do this locally.

 

 

some good info here, i had a good experience with trail labs in Missouri, minimum 1 week downtime:

 

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2 hours ago, olddbrider said:

Has anyone had their DVO fork and/or shock serviced locally?

I'm way overdue for the 100 hour service on both (not just the lowers/air can service, but the complete rebuild of the dampers) and I'm trying to decide whether to send it to DVO. They are telling me 3-4 weeks plus shipping time, which would have me off the bike for a long time... I'm wondering if anyone can do this locally.

 

 

I have a couple Pikes in the garage, 100 and 110mm axle, ~130mm travel. If you need a fork for a few weeks, ping me.

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2 minutes ago, AustinBike said:

I have a couple Pikes in the garage, 100 and 110mm axle, ~130mm travel. If you need a fork for a few weeks, ping me.

That's a super generous offer. I'm getting ready to be out of town for about 10 days, so the timing would be great if I can get things moving on my fork and shock since I won't be using my bike for a while.

I just booked an appointment with Trail Labs. I called first and talked through the process. Seems like a solid company and they claim they get things serviced and shipped out in 1 business day. Under $300 for a full service on both my fork and shock. I have to pay for shipping there.

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36 minutes ago, Chief said:

Service/rebuild for a Diamond is pretty simple and only requires three new parts. You'll need new wiper seals, a new damper end cap and a new air piston. Along with specified fork oil and slick honey/fork butter. 

This is the procedure for the damper service;

http://tech.dvosuspension.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/diamond_damperservicebleed.pdf

Looks like you’ll also need a vice, soft jaws, 22mm chamferless socket, heat gun, and DVO’s special oil catch can. 
 

Reading the instructions, it does looks fairly simple compared to other damper services, but it does require a number of tools that you’re average home mechanic doesn’t have. 

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I do pretty much all my own maintenance/repair/upgrades, but I've never attempted to do suspension work. I'd like to get to a point where I could do a basic lower leg/air can service, but I think I'll leave the full rebuild to the pros.

I'll post an update once I get everything back from Trail Labs.

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31 minutes ago, WLemke said:

Looks like you’ll also need a vice, soft jaws, 22mm chamferless socket, heat gun, and DVO’s special oil catch can. 
 

Reading the instructions, it does looks fairly simple compared to other damper services, but it does require a number of tools that you’re average home mechanic doesn’t have. 

I was about to offhand post something like "You mean vise grips and a t-shirt?" but then I looked at the instructions.  That ground down socket is obnoxious.

dvo.png

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23 hours ago, WLemke said:

Looks like you’ll also need a vice, soft jaws, 22mm chamferless socket, heat gun, and DVO’s special oil catch can. 
 

Reading the instructions, it does looks fairly simple compared to other damper services, but it does require a number of tools that you’re average home mechanic doesn’t have. 

I clamped my damper in my bike stand. A hair dryer will work. Made my own chamfer less socket. You can bleed it without the catch cup. I do think that DVO should supply a catch cup for service though.

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Pro tip for the week:

After bleeding XTR brakes about 3,518 different ways to try to get them tight on the bike, ask yourself, "hey, what is that bolt coming out of the handle?" Turns out it is a lever adjustment. I had effectively bled all of the air out of the system and had them properly installed. A few turns and I was golden.

 

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47 minutes ago, AntonioGG said:

I had posted about this a while back as the reason why I could never get these bled properly before.  Once I backed out the adjustment all the way it was a quick and easy bleed.

I'm like your wife, I never listen to anything you say 😉 

Riding around walnut with no real strength in the back brakes today was a challenge, but I'm glad they are dialed in because the greenbelt tomorrow morning would be a real mess with only front brakes.

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