Jump to content
AustinBike

What ya cookin'? Share your thoughts on food at home!

Recommended Posts

Omelets are the weekend tradition at my house. I've been doing them for well over a decade and they are all the rave with the relatives. The key is simple - don't let the egg over power the omelet. I use between 2 and 2.5 large eggs per omelet but I use a large enough pan to keep the layer of egg relatively thin. Equally important is not overcooking the egg. I start with a heaping tablespoon of margarine in the pan at medium heat. Add the egg and as it starts to harden, constantly break it up with a spatula moving it away from the edge of the pan to the center, allowing the liquid to move to the edges where it cooks fastest. Doing this gives it a lumpy looking consistency as the egg hardens, but you end up with a nice soft shell vs. a hard browned (scorched) shell. While the egg is still soft and runny in spots, I reduce the heat from medium to low and start layering in the ingredients. Generally that is chopped yellow sweet onions and cubed black forest ham that I've had simmering a while on medium heat with some margarine. Then I layer in some fresh, chopped red and yellow peppers. By now the egg is still loose but firm enough to flip the empty half over the filled half. It may break apart some and not be real pretty, but again you're trying hard not to overcook the egg. No point in flipping it either - just scoop it onto a plate and put it in the microwave for 45 seconds to fully cook any of the egg that is still runny. If you want to top with cheese, do so prior to microwaving (prefer mine without cheese). Top the steaming omelet with your favorite salsa (mine is Clint's Texas Salsa - Hot). Juices from the margarine, peppers, and salsa will be running all over the place but rest assured the egg is cooked to perfection - a soft, flimsy layer that merely complements an explosion of other flavors. When there's leftover grilled ribeyes in the fridge, I dice those up and simmer with those same sweet yellow onions. Instead of the chopped peppers though, I may throw in a chopped up Honey Crisp apple to go with the salty steak and hot salsa.        

 

Omelet.PNG

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, throet said:

Omelets are the weekend tradition at my house. I've been doing them for well over a decade and they are all the rave with the relatives. The key is simple - don't let the egg over power the omelet. I use between 2 and 2.5 large eggs per omelet but I use a large enough pan to keep the layer of egg relatively thin. Equally important is not overcooking the egg. I start with a heaping tablespoon of margarine in the pan at medium heat. Add the egg and as it starts to harden, constantly break it up with a spatula moving it away from the edge of the pan to the center, allowing the liquid to move to the edges where it cooks fastest. Doing this gives it a lumpy looking consistency as the egg hardens, but you end up with a nice soft shell vs. a hard browned (scorched) shell. While the egg is still soft and runny in spots, I reduce the heat from medium to low and start layering in the ingredients. Generally that is chopped yellow sweet onions and cubed black forest ham that I've had simmering a while on medium heat with some margarine. Then I layer in some fresh, chopped red and yellow peppers. By now the egg is still loose but firm enough to flip the empty half over the filled half. It may break apart some and not be real pretty, but again you're trying hard not to overcook the egg. No point in flipping it either - just scoop it onto a plate and put it in the microwave for 45 seconds to fully cook any of the egg that is still runny. If you want to top with cheese, do so prior to microwaving (prefer mine without cheese). Top the steaming omelet with your favorite salsa (mine is Clint's Texas Salsa - Hot). Juices from the margarine, peppers, and salsa will be running all over the place but rest assured the egg is cooked to perfection - a soft, flimsy layer that merely complements an explosion of other flavors. When there's leftover grilled ribeyes in the fridge, I dice those up and simmer with those same sweet yellow onions. Instead of the chopped peppers though, I may throw in a chopped up Honey Crisp apple to go with the salty steak and hot salsa.        

 

Omelet.PNG

I flip mine but I make them a big thicker in a smaller pan so the egg is thicker.  Air flip, then turn off the heat.  One thing I've never been able to do is roll them like Jaques Pepin.  Have you tried that?

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, AntonioGG said:

Have you tried that?

Nope never tried rolling them. That would never work with the thin layer of egg that I use and we really don't like having that much egg in the omelet. Sometimes mine break apart just trying to fold them over. Ugly but eventually gets covered with melted cheese and / or salsa. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Big cooking tip. We made curry again and the recipe is onions, ginger, garlic to which we added jalapeños. Then after the sauté with all of the spices, etc. you then strain out the onions, etc so you get a nice smooth creamy curry. Last time we just tossed the onions, etc but this time we saved them. This morning I scrambled some eggs but beforehand I tossed some bacon fat in the pan, along with a healthy scoop of the “leftovers” and man does that kick up scrambled eggs!

 

IMG_5464.thumb.jpeg.b05ab49f84ee8e0877c0f9720f8e1708.jpeg

Edited by AustinBike
  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2020 at 9:43 PM, throet said:

Omelets are the weekend tradition at my house. I've been doing them for well over a decade and they are all the rave with the relatives. The key is simple - don't let the egg over power the omelet. I use between 2 and 2.5 large eggs per omelet but I use a large enough pan to keep the layer of egg relatively thin. Equally important is not overcooking the egg. I start with a heaping tablespoon of margarine in the pan at medium heat. Add the egg and as it starts to harden, constantly break it up with a spatula moving it away from the edge of the pan to the center, allowing the liquid to move to the edges where it cooks fastest. Doing this gives it a lumpy looking consistency as the egg hardens, but you end up with a nice soft shell vs. a hard browned (scorched) shell. While the egg is still soft and runny in spots, I reduce the heat from medium to low and start layering in the ingredients. Generally that is chopped yellow sweet onions and cubed black forest ham that I've had simmering a while on medium heat with some margarine. Then I layer in some fresh, chopped red and yellow peppers. By now the egg is still loose but firm enough to flip the empty half over the filled half. It may break apart some and not be real pretty, but again you're trying hard not to overcook the egg. No point in flipping it either - just scoop it onto a plate and put it in the microwave for 45 seconds to fully cook any of the egg that is still runny. If you want to top with cheese, do so prior to microwaving (prefer mine without cheese). Top the steaming omelet with your favorite salsa (mine is Clint's Texas Salsa - Hot). Juices from the margarine, peppers, and salsa will be running all over the place but rest assured the egg is cooked to perfection - a soft, flimsy layer that merely complements an explosion of other flavors. When there's leftover grilled ribeyes in the fridge, I dice those up and simmer with those same sweet yellow onions. Instead of the chopped peppers though, I may throw in a chopped up Honey Crisp apple to go with the salty steak and hot salsa.        

 

Omelet.PNG

I use a little bit of water in the eggs when I do omelets. I use a cast iron flat skillet like a fajita pan. I let the egg get set on the stove top add my filling then put in the oven under the broiler to finish it and cook all the way through. The omelet comes out super fluffy like this and has less chance of getting overdone you just need to keep an eye on it in the broiler. When it comes out I fold and serve.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 5/18/2020 at 7:28 PM, jcarneytx said:

I've mostly just been cooking simple meals, from Hellofresh. Get the 2-serving/4 meal package, so I'll have something to take to work. Rest of the time I just make do with miscellaneous items (beer brats and tortillas, or sandwich of some sort) or order something delivered/takeout. 

Just found a big packet of instant yeast, so will start making loaves of bread, once I have the rest of the ingredients. And now that I've moved into an actual house, with more space, will be making pizzas from scratch.  Also need to start a new batch of beer, since I've not made anything since November.

Pizza from scratch is awesome! The wife and I do them on occasion.

 

IMG_2694.jpeg

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't have a specific recipe, but I have been making chickpea flour omelets lately. quick and easy protein packed start to my morning. I think this is similar to a Besan Chilla in Indian cuisine. I still have not perfected the recipe, but the batter consists of:
•chickpea flour (find it labeled "besan" at your local Indian grocery store)
•water or alternative milk. I usually use plain almond milk
•kala namak aka black salt, also found in an Indian grocery store. this salt has an egg-like flavor. use it sparingly, just a pinch!
•nutritional yeast
•oil
•get creative with chopped onions, tomatoes, garlic, turmeric, etc.

whip everything in a bowl with a whisk or mixer. I find it helpful to let it sit for a few minutes before cooking. poor the batter into a nonstick pan and cook it like a pancake. if you have skills, you can flip it over with a flick of the pan. I usually end up sprinkling some veggie cheez shreds on it and fold it in half. if you mix it right, it should fluff up a bit. I like to top mine with hot sauce.

let me know if you've tried this. to find one of the many variations, look up "vegan chickpea flour omelet."

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, taco_junkie said:

Working on my bread.

image.thumb.png.9b2e7f636035ea16217bda53667d58b1.png

image.thumb.png.cd75904c7a1b27c4be6a73cca81e80be.png

Those look gorgeous!  What are you doing the cuts with?  That's something I struggle with.  The King Arthur site says to use a serrated knife but it doesn't seem to work well.  I tried a single edge razor blade but it didn't work great either.  I'm resisting buying the special knife for this.

How are you proofing?  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, AntonioGG said:

Those look gorgeous!  What are you doing the cuts with?  That's something I struggle with.  The King Arthur site says to use a serrated knife but it doesn't seem to work well.  I tried a single edge razor blade but it didn't work great either.  I'm resisting buying the special knife for this.

How are you proofing?  

Bread nerd alert!

I freaking love bread but my waist doesn't appreciate it.  The smell of sourdough bread cooking or fresh nan or a fat homemade tortilla is amazing.  Damn you both!

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have had always had our kids cook and they both enjoy it and do well. Each week they are required to make us something legit.
So this weekend we are starting a family food day. We drew straws for a meal and then each of us have to fix a real meal for everyone else. Should be fun and they are already wanting to do this each month or more often.


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/9/2020 at 5:08 PM, AntonioGG said:

Those look gorgeous!  What are you doing the cuts with?  That's something I struggle with.  The King Arthur site says to use a serrated knife but it doesn't seem to work well.  I tried a single edge razor blade but it didn't work great either.  I'm resisting buying the special knife for this.

How are you proofing?

Thanks!

So the top one I didn't cut. Instead I tried putting in the oven wrong side up and it naturally split that way. Kind of a kneat trick but it went out more than up and that was disappointing. The bottom one I just cut with a filet knife because it's the least used (sharpest) knife I have.

They were both from the Jim Lahey school of no knead. For the proof I'm turning out and folding a few times to form a ball then it sits covered like 2 hours. Still working on that step to get good height for better sandwich slices and that 2nd picture is maybe my best so far. The recipe is all over the internet and youtube but this one is closest to what I'm doing: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/no-knead-bread-56389453

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 hours ago, AustinBike said:

Smash burger. 

Double patty.

Greasy. Like a diner. 

That does look like a tasty burger. Reminds me of the time we very faithfully recreated smoked whisky burgers by the BBQ Pit Boys. And they're real easy to do. The video was just so satisfying to watch, we had to make the burgers, and they didn't disappoint (although I can't approve of their whiskey choice for actual drinking though). 

 

image.png.c86362b7b3e5d5d63188d4402de89313.png

(Yes, those are Schott glasses.)

image.png.3677d84c3c0698d535ef89cf74e726ef.png

(Actually smoking thick-cut bacon made it extra awesome.)

image.png.cbe8d1908af70e897b923c19c70c8078.png

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/10/2020 at 12:22 PM, Cafeend said:

We have had always had our kids cook and they both enjoy it and do well. Each week they are required to make us something legit.
So this weekend we are starting a family food day. We drew straws for a meal and then each of us have to fix a real meal for everyone else. Should be fun and they are already wanting to do this each month or more often.


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk
 

This was such a hit that everyone wanted to do this again. My wife had done Crepes  (she is a Celiac - so everything is Gluten Free that is made ) Son made pasta carbonara for lunch , I did blackened Mahi for dinner and my daughter made creme puffs for desert.

We drew straws again and this Monday we are doing this whole deal again, Shocked that the kids are diving into this and not half assed either, they are into making some cool stuff 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Barry said:

That does look like a tasty burger. Reminds me of the time we very faithfully recreated smoked whisky burgers by the BBQ Pit Boys. And they're real easy to do. The video was just so satisfying to watch, we had to make the burgers, and they didn't disappoint (although I can't approve of their whiskey choice for actual drinking though). 

 

image.png.c86362b7b3e5d5d63188d4402de89313.png

(Yes, those are Schott glasses.)

image.png.3677d84c3c0698d535ef89cf74e726ef.png

(Actually smoking thick-cut bacon made it extra awesome.)

image.png.cbe8d1908af70e897b923c19c70c8078.png

 

 

Man those look great!!!!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, taco_junkie said:

Thanks!

So the top one I didn't cut. Instead I tried putting in the oven wrong side up and it naturally split that way. Kind of a kneat trick but it went out more than up and that was disappointing. The bottom one I just cut with a filet knife because it's the least used (sharpest) knife I have.

They were both from the Jim Lahey school of no knead. For the proof I'm turning out and folding a few times to form a ball then it sits covered like 2 hours. Still working on that step to get good height for better sandwich slices and that 2nd picture is maybe my best so far. The recipe is all over the internet and youtube but this one is closest to what I'm doing: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/no-knead-bread-56389453

Cool thanks!

For sandwich I'm making the 100% whole wheat sourdough recipe from King Arthur's website.  It's the first time I can make a loaf that actually looks like a proper loaf of bread I can make a sandwich out of.  It does cheat a bit by adding a teaspoon of instant yeast, but it's not half white and half whole wheat which is great.  I'm still experimenting with how much to knead.  I've gone to almost no knead to a little bit of kneading and seeing how that changes the rising times and strength of the bread.  I use a kitchen aid mixer to mix, then for almost no knead I just fold it a few times.  For increasing the kneading I use the kitchen aid or do some extra folding.  It's pretty fun experimenting.  This one just proofs in the 8.5" loaf pan.  At some point I'll be brave and not use the instant yeast.

I do make their extra sourdough recipe boules and my family loves them but those take more time.  You have to have part of the dough sit in the fridge for 12 hours before you can finish, but it's a proper sourdough with a great crust.  I just wish I could make the cuts look proper.   These proof on the baking sheet.

I want to try proofing on floured cloth.  I tried it once but it was the wrong recipe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yesterday's happy hour cooking show was one skillet lasagna:

IMG_5677.thumb.jpeg.2dede49b33c64f52dea1c12018fd3d46.jpeg

 

https://thymeforcookingblog.com/2019/10/pasta-with-beef-spinach-and-ricotta/

 

And tonight we just used the HEB pizza crust for a jalapeño, eggplant and sausage pizza:

1223658329_IMG_5679(1).thumb.jpeg.3afcb74a9b7c11c3dac3b1d430379ad5.jpeg

While I still firmly believe that thin crust pizza is the work of the devil, I'll allow this masterpiece to hit my belly.

 

Edited by AustinBike
  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, AustinBike said:

Yesterday's happy hour cooking show was one skillet lasagna:

IMG_5677.thumb.jpeg.2dede49b33c64f52dea1c12018fd3d46.jpeg

 

https://thymeforcookingblog.com/2019/10/pasta-with-beef-spinach-and-ricotta/

 

And tonight we just used the HEB pizza crust for a jalapeño, eggplant and sausage pizza:

1223658329_IMG_5679(1).thumb.jpeg.3afcb74a9b7c11c3dac3b1d430379ad5.jpeg

While I still firmly believe that thin crust pizza is the work of the devil, I'll allow this masterpiece to hit my belly.

 

I was just reading a story about how there are some Chicagoans who groan at the talk of deep dish.  They mentioned some place.  I'll have to dig up that story so you can comment on it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...