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Lacch

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I like the Park Tools Tire Boot as well. Can help with really ugly sidewall issues.

 

As for inserts, I actually feel more comfortable having them in for a Colorado trip in July. Granted, I cannot take my tire off easily with the Rimpact installed, so swapping to a tube is going to be tough. But I have extra juice and boogers to fix small stuff. Really big stuff, where you know the tire is toast anyway, the Rimpact is so large I can ride down on just the Rimpact.

For all the small stuff, I have an empty Nuuns tube to hold it all:

masterlink

Park tire boot

valve core (2x)

Presta/Schrader adapter

boogers and reemer

$5

keeps it all safe and secure and in one place

 

On the SS I also like to carry 2 master links, a chain tool, and a section of chain. Since I cannot shorten the chain if I have a problem. That's only on really long, far from home stuff.

 

 

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On 6/21/2021 at 4:28 PM, WhoAmI said:

Well, I don't see a /s but still am not sure you're serious.  Back in the day before tubeless, the guys in my group and I would eventually end up patching a tube trail side, sometimes more than once

I was serious, but i forgot about the little patch things. I have had zero luck with those. I only use glue to repair my tubes. And it seems hard enough to get it right in the garage. 

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4 hours ago, circuitbreaker said:

I was serious, but i forgot about the little patch things. I have had zero luck with those. I only use glue to repair my tubes. And it seems hard enough to get it right in the garage. 

The trick with either one is to prep the tube:  clean, dry, and sand off the casting ridges.  In the garage I use a dreamer sanding drum.  Makes quick work of it and I do several tubes at once.

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On 6/21/2021 at 11:09 AM, throet said:

I also carry spare chain-links for 10-spd, 11-spd, and 12-spd (used to ride all three regularly) and a multi-tool.    

@throet I broke my first chain today and unfortunately wasn't prepared to fix it on the trail. 

When you say you have spare links for 10-spd, 11-spd, etc... what does that mean? Why are chain links not universal?

I'm looking to pick up a multi-tool and a spare link to take on rides with me. I have a 1x9 drivetrain, does that mean I buy a link for a 9 speed?

 

Also, this chain that I broke, is it trash now? 

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Links are not universal because each chain is a different gauge. 

As you get higher in gear count the chain needs to be correspondingly thinner because the cassette spacing gets tighter.

I use 9-speed for my singlespeed because they are the strongest (hard to find 8sp these days.). I have 10sp and 12sp drivetrains so I need 3 different kinds of links.

Also note that some links are "single use" meaning that once you engage them, they are not designed to be removed and re-engaged. KMC are good for multi-use.

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2 minutes ago, AustinBike said:

Also note that some links are "single use" meaning that once you engage them, they are not designed to be removed and re-engaged.

I get several thousands of miles and a dozen or so removals out of the 11sp SRAM PC-X1 "single use" links. I only change them out when they get easy to remove by hand. Although I have had maybe 2 or 3 of them fail me during use...in about 25± thousand miles since going 11sp. And I pack several of them. It's an easy on trail fix.

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57 minutes ago, AustinBike said:

Links are not universal because each chain is a different gauge. 

My drivetrain is 1x9, but the original chain is a KMC X8.3 (listed for 8 speed). Seems there is some wiggle room for the proper chain gauge?

Given that the chain is listed as 8 speed, I should be buying an 8 speed spare link. Am I understanding correctly?

If/when I replace the chain, is there any benefit to staying with an 8speed chain or should I go with a 9speed to match the drivetrain?

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5 hours ago, Lacch said:

@throet I broke my first chain today and unfortunately wasn't prepared to fix it on the trail. 

When you say you have spare links for 10-spd, 11-spd, etc... what does that mean? Why are chain links not universal?

I'm looking to pick up a multi-tool and a spare link to take on rides with me. I have a 1x9 drivetrain, does that mean I buy a link for a 9 speed?

 

Also, this chain that I broke, is it trash now? 

I don't know anything about compatibility for 8/9 speed chains, but I know that I needed different master links for the SRAM 11spd, SRAM 12spd, and Shimano 10spd. 

Regarding replacement of your chain, that should be done when it's worn out and not just because you broke a link. The bike shop can tell you when to replace the chain, or you can get a gauge that measures how stretched out it is. You should notice some degradation with your shifting when it is time to replace the chain. 

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Get a chain checker, there are several of them. If you take it to the shop the answer will almost always be yes, and they will only sell the expensive ones.

Go to amazon and get a chain checker and two chains. Having a spare hanging around is never a bad thing. All 3 will be the cost of an expensive chain from a shop.

The key in replacing the chain is to count the links, not size it relative to the length of the old one because they stretch. If you just do the comparison you will end up with increasing longer chains and more problems.

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I though an 8-speed chain should NOT work very well on a 9-speed cassette. I think you can move "down" (10s chain on a 9s cassette) but you might run into problems going the other way.

Unless the chain is really mangled in a few places, you should be able to use it for a while by replacing broken links with quick links if you break a link.

A basic chain "breaker" tool, chain wear gauge, and a quick link plier are good to have around. Replace the chain when you can confirm it's worn by measuring.

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If you haven’t got access to a chain checker, a ruler or tape measure and simple math is just as good. Chain checkers tell you how close you are to the recommended <1% chain stretch. New Chains pin to pin measure out to exactly 12” so 1% stretch would be 12.12 or roughly 12 1/8. If chain is near or more than 12 1/8” pin to pin it’s time to replace. Kept a metric/US metal ruler on my peg board for many years for this purpose til I finally got a chain checker. When the eyes go it’s hard to see those 1/16 dashes. 🙄

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On 10/24/2021 at 11:04 AM, Barry said:

I get several thousands of miles and a dozen or so removals out of the 11sp SRAM PC-X1 "single use" links. I only change them out when they get easy to remove by hand. Although I have had maybe 2 or 3 of them fail me during use...in about 25± thousand miles since going 11sp. And I pack several of them. It's an easy on trail fix.

+1.  The only power link I had fail was a brand new one I put in for a 12 hour race.  Failed halfway through the first lap.  I save all my old power links and carry some in my spares bottle/pack and some in my car.  I figured if someone is stuck with a broken chain they will not be picky.

On 10/24/2021 at 5:45 PM, AustinBike said:

Get a chain checker, there are several of them. If you take it to the shop the answer will almost always be yes, and they will only sell the expensive ones.

It’s been my experience and understanding that right now you can’t get shimano chains (or almost anything shimano) and you can only get low end sram chains but it has been 3-4 weeks since I last checked.

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3 hours ago, Lacch said:

Ok, chain fixed! 

Spoke too soon...

Took the bike out for a test ride just now and anytime I put weight on the pedals the chain 'pops' on the sprockets (in all gears). I ended up replacing the chain with a KMC 9speed to match my drivetrain, and matched the length of the original.

Not sure what's up, but now I know what I'm doing this evening....

Edited by Lacch
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the way the chain needs to be routed through the derailer is not intuitive. double check that the chain wraps around the cogs correctly and between the first cog and that little tab in the middle of the cage.

 

if you have a 9-speed cassette and derailer, a 9-speed chain should be ideal.

Edited by mack_turtle
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So I purchased my way into going tubeless at least on one of my bikes. I have sealant and am having fun figuring out that learning curve. However, for larger punctures are y'all packing bacon strips? What's your favorite trailside tool for installing them?

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Posted (edited)

I'm carrying one of these. I like how self-contained and non-pokey it is. plus, you don't have to buy special proprietary replacement seals like the Dart system. just shove whatever strips you want in there. I've used it on a few other riders' bikes and on mine with success.

https://ride.lezyne.com/products/tubeless-kit

I've also found that a puncture that won't seal is sometimes due to insufficient sloshiness of the sealant in the tire. basically, it's dried up. I've rejuvenated old sealant on the side of the trail by squirting some water into the tire, shaking it, and reinflating.

I also carry a tiny bottle of Berryman Tire Seal'r everywhere just in case.

Edited by mack_turtle
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If you’ve ridden a tire for any length of time on trail the bacon strip route is much better than a tube. The PITA of it is there is usually several things stuck in the tire already and if you can’t see them from the spooge residue you’ll end up puncturing the tube in no time and be afoot again! 

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2 hours ago, AustinBike said:

I am a firm believer in tubes. The number of times I have sat trailside with <name redacted> while he tries 2 or 3 bacon strips before giving up is high. Tubes are easy, one and done.

I carry a tube, but the plug takes ten seconds and works almost every time. removing the wheel and tire to replace a tube takes a lot longer. I don't even have to get off the bike to shove a plug in a puncture.

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Riding the Ledges in Bentonville this past weekend, my buddy was able to use a couple of bacon strips to seal a puncture in the tread area of his rear tire. It spewed some more sealant when he aired it up, but eventually sealed up enough to finish the ride and ride again the next morning. I got a sidewall gash on my rear tire within minutes of his mishap and didn't even attempt plugging it. Taped it from the inside and then tubed it. No problems for the remainder of the weekend. Tire was brand-new; so going to just leave the tube in to get as much wear on the tire as I can. 

Also of note, I had to deal with the dreaded "what do I do with my tire insert now that I'm tubed" scenario! In my case, even the dense Rimpact Pro folded up nicely and was able to be fully stuffed into my large Osprey Syncro 20. I would just caution that if you're using tire inserts, make sure you have a large enough pack to contain it in the unlikely event of tubing the tire.  

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8 minutes ago, throet said:

Riding the Ledges in Bentonville this past weekend, my buddy was able to use a couple of bacon strips to seal a puncture in the tread area of his rear tire. It spewed some more sealant when he aired it up, but eventually sealed up enough to finish the ride and ride again the next morning. I got a sidewall gash on my rear tire within minutes of his mishap and didn't even attempt plugging it. Taped it from the inside and then tubed it. No problems for the remainder of the weekend. Tire was brand-new; so going to just leave the tube in to get as much wear on the tire as I can. 

Also of note, I had to deal with the dreaded "what do I do with my tire insert now that I'm tubed" scenario! In my case, even the dense Rimpact Pro folded up nicely and was able to be fully stuffed into my large Osprey Syncro 20. I would just caution that if you're using tire inserts, make sure you have a large enough pack to contain it in the unlikely event of tubing the tire.  

Glad you guys made it out to AR.  Are you finally going with maxxis now😁

At most I carry a small multi tool on local rides. Out of town stuff I'll also carry CO2 but no patches etc. I must be lucky in the course of 10yrs of MTB, I've never ripped a sidewall.

I went with vittoria inserts since they can be ridden without air long enough to get you back to the car. 

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