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Lacch

Trail gear list

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Had my first walk of shame today due to not having a tire repair kit on me. (Shout out to @throet for giving me a Brushy Creek tour, too bad I popped a tire in the first 30min :|)

I'm curious what type of gear everyone packs with them on the trail.

I just picked up a super small saddle bag and packed it with....

- 1 tube 
- 2x tire levers (do I need 2?!?, I don't think I do)
- 2x CO2 (probably don't need 2 of these either)
- CO2 Tire Inflator

 

What do you guys carry out on the trail with you?

backpacks?

Hand pump?

First Aid of any sort?

Insurance/Drivers License/etc

multi-tool?

pressure gauge?

should I bring a patch kit? is it realistic to patch a tube on a trail?

anything else?

 

 


 

 

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In a plastic cylinder under my downtube:

*27.5" tube (fits in 29" tire but more compact)

*CO2 and inflator

*Tire plugs aka bacons strips and plug tool

*A few inches of duct tape

* tire lever, I usually need one

 

Strapped on my frame: *Lezyne Alloy Drive pump attached by a Twofish block

 

In my hip pack

*1.5-liters of water

*Small bottle of tire sealant

*bike multi tool

*Spare quick link

*Leatherman squirt PS tool

* Plastic bag containing a short length of TP (ever have to poop in the woods?), some bandaids, and one or two alcohol wipes

*Phone, ID, etc., Snacks

 

Bonus info: if you're tubeless (who would chose tubes?!), and you get a slow leak that won't seal, squirt some water in your tire to loosen up the dried sealant and reseat the tire. It might seal up. Worked for me one time.

Patching a tube on the trail is totally doable.

I might be interested in finding a very compact tire gauge now that it's been mentioned.

Edited by mack_turtle
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58 minutes ago, Lacch said:

should I bring a patch kit? is it realistic to patch a tube on a trail?

you should be running tubeless. if you get a puncture in your tire, that's what the bacon strips are for. If your tire tears, then you throw in the spare tube.

i don't think its possible to patch a tube on the trail.

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If I drive my bike to brushy/walnut and it’s cool enough that I can get away with one water bottle, I only bring a multi tool. 
 

If I ride to the trails or it’s hot enough that I need to bring a hydration pack, I bring a multi tool, pump, tire plug, and a small microfiber towel. (A good hitch hiker always brings a towel)
 

I stopped bringing a back up tube about 2 years ago when I started using cushcore. It would be so difficult to get the insert out on the trail and they are run flat capable so why even bother with a tube. 
 

It sounds like you are still running tubes. If that’s your thing and you’re sticking to it, then by all means, you do you. With that said, there are absolutely no benefits to not running a tubeless set up. 

Edited by WLemke
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I have to drive to all of my trails so most everything stays in the truck . On rides, I bring a water bottle and my wallet. I'd rather run a heavier tire/insert than strap all that BS on to my bike.

 

Edited by ATXZJ
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*Bike Specific Multitool

*Tube 

*Levers

*Pump

*Master Link 

*$10 Had to bum a tube once and I felt like a jerk not having anything to give but a thank you. 

*First Aid (band aids basically) 

*Gerber Dime Multitool 

*Water, as much as my frame and fanny pack will hold. 

*Wallet/keys/phone 

 

This forum is a tubeless fan club. Many for good reason but I've found with my sporadic riding schedule and riding style tubes have been very dependable for ME and worth the "drawbacks". YRMV. 

Edited by RedRider3141
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Even though I am tubeless I carry a tube and a pump.

All of the fancy bacon strips and other plugs are great in theory, but when you are riding with a bunch of people and you flat on a tubeless setup, bite the bullet and put a tube in and just move on. Some of the most frustrating times on a bike include standing around on the side of the trail while some bonewipe tries his 3rd or 4th "trick" to fix his tubeless setup while everyone stands around watching him. This has happened far too often. I got to the ride early last Saturday and noticed my rear tire was losing air. Immediately popped a tube in. 10 minutes and I was ready to go, before some of the other people even showed up. Contrast that with the guy that has run out of CO2 because he's already tried multiple "solutions" to fix his tire and everyone around him is starting to taste the beer at that point...

Oh, and another tip. Until you are really, really dialed in on your bike and riding every week, always show up a half hour early. Get your bike set up and pedal it a half mile in the parking lot. This will help you ensure that everything is ready to go. I hate the people that pull up at 8:59 for a 9:00 ride and have to get dressed, pump up their tires and check their drivetrain. Do you friends a favor, get there early. Better yet, do all of that at home before you even leave.

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54 minutes ago, AustinBike said:

.Oh, and another tip. Until you are really, really dialed in on your bike and riding every week, always show up a half hour early. Get your bike set up and pedal it a half mile in the parking lot. This will help you ensure that everything is ready to go. I hate the people that pull up at 8:59 for a 9:00 ride and have to get dressed, pump up their tires and check their drivetrain. Do you friends a favor, get there early. Better yet, do all of that at home before you even leave.

Word! This is not hard to do. Folks, please take heed.

On bacon; I now carry a preloaded bacon strip in my hydration pack that I can get to without taking the pack off. I learned this trick from a friend on a ride when he got a puncture. He reached in to his "holster" and whipped out his preloaded bacon, looked at the hole for about three seconds to determine if the sealant was going to work or not, decided it wouldn't, and stuck the bacon in the hole. He barely lost any air and could have kept riding. Very cool.

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18 hours ago, mack_turtle said:

*27.5" tube (fits in 29" tire but more compact)

Sorry @Lacch had I known this, we could have just put that 27.5 tube in that I was carrying in my pack. Apparently I falsely assumed only a 29in would work for your 29 inch tire. Suppose that lack of knowledge cost you a full ride and me a chance to demonstrate an on-trail tube install. Lesson learned there for sure. 

Regarding the CO2 cartridges, I always carry 2-3 when carrying a pack. No sense risking a misfire with only a single cartridge. I also carry bacon strips, extra valve cores and valve core tool, a presta-schrader adapter (works better with my CO2 pump - especially with shorter valve stems), and a couple of plastic tire tools. I also carry spare chain-links for 10-spd, 11-spd, and 12-spd (used to ride all three regularly) and a multi-tool.    

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4 hours ago, mack_turtle said:

I have tire inserts and I have not tried putting an emergency tube in with that setup. I carry that tube, but has anyone tried that? What has to happen? I imagine taking the foam out and looping it over my shoulders to finish the ride.

This has me thinking about my upcoming Colorado trip. I'm wondering if I'm better off without my Rimpact inserts during my trip. Would hate to have to hassle with trying to transport a sealant coated section of foam in my pack. Besides, the reduced weight would be an advantage on those long ass climbs. Generally on rides like those far away from home and medical aid, I'm going to be picking my lines carefully regardless.    

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I've seen spare tubes that sat in a pack for so long that they dried out and cracked, which makes me leery of those "straps" that people use to carry a spare. spend enough time with a wadded up tube strapped onto your bike, and sun exposure will compromise the tube, leaving you with the disappointing illusion that you have a spare. I'd prefer to keep mine sealed up in a plastic wrap or something similar.

Edited by mack_turtle
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5 hours ago, mack_turtle said:

I have tire inserts and I have not tried putting an emergency tube in with that setup. I carry that tube, but has anyone tried that? What has to happen? I imagine taking the foam out and looping it over my shoulders to finish the ride.

What insert are you running? I've had no problem putting tube in the tire with the insert still in. But certainly you have to check both the tire and the insert for thorns and such. I run HuckNorris for now, and have just stuck the tube under the insert without issue. I never leave it longer than it takes me to get back home, but it sure beats the hell out of trying to figure out where to wrap or pack a Stan's coated insert. I've done this multiple times with both 27.5x2.6 and with 700x50 tires. 

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I jam my spare tube in a modified (small holes on the sides to hold it in with a small bungee cord) water bottle in the frame rack. This method was because of a lesson learned like Mack Turtle said from a strapped on tube that ended up having holes in it when I needed it. Now it's totally protected. I have tire tools, three specific Allen wrenches, up to three air cartridges, and a multi tool that I've used mostly for the pliers and knife, in the bottle.  

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2 minutes ago, Barry said:

What insert are you running? I've had no problem putting tube in the tire with the insert still in. But certainly you have to check both the tire and the insert for thorns and such. I run HuckNorris for now, and have just stuck the tube under the insert without issue. I never leave it longer than it takes me to get back home, but it sure beats the hell out of trying to figure out where to wrap or pack a Stan's coated insert. I've done this multiple times with both 27.5x2.6 and with 700x50 tires. 

I have a Nukeproof ARD, which is similar to Cushcore and a few others. Huck Norris is a different shape, so that makes more sense. most of the others hug the rim, so I can't see how I could fit a tube and the insert at the same time.

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4 hours ago, mack_turtle said:

I've seen spare tubes that sat in a pack for so long that they dried out and cracked, which makes me leery of those "straps" that people use to carry a spare. spend enough time with a wadded up tube strapped onto your bike, and sun exposure will compromise the tube, leaving you with the disappointing illusion that you have a spare. I'd prefer to keep mine sealed up in a plastic wrap or something similar.

That, and more. I change out my spare tube every six months, whether it needs it or not. I want it to inflate if I ever actually need it to.

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On 6/20/2021 at 4:36 PM, circuitbreaker said:

i don't think its possible to patch a tube on the trail.

Well, I don't see a /s but still am not sure you're serious.  Back in the day before tubeless, the guys in my group and I would eventually end up patching a tube trail side, sometimes more than once. I remember @Shinerider finally replacing a tube with something like six patches on it. It's definitely a thing. 

 

As far as what I carry with me, I'm old, old school and a former Marine; I carry a lot b/c I don't want to walk out or have to rely on anyone.

  • Pack w/ 3 liter bladder
  • Master link
  • Spoke wrench
  • Glasses cleaning solution & cloth (being blind in one eye, I never ride w/o my polycarbonate lensed glasses)
  • Pressure gauge
  • Multi-tool w/ chain breaker
  • Spare tube
  • CO2 cannisters (usually 2)
  • Tire levers
  • Patch kit
  • Bacon strips & insertion tool
  • Hand pump
  • Shock pump
  • Nutrition
  • Tubeless valve
  • Valve stem removal tool
  • Wallet
  • Phone
Edited by WhoAmI
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10 hours ago, AustinBike said:

I hate the people that pull up at 8:59 for a 9:00 ride and have to get dressed, pump up their tires and check their drivetrain. Do you friends a favor, get there early. Better yet, do all of that at home before you even leave.

Wait. Are we meeting at 9, or does the ride start at 9?

nm.  I misread your post, John!

 

Edited by WhoAmI
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I've only used a CO2 cartridge to use it all. What happens if you stop partway and leave the inflator screwed on and put it away? Does it slowly leak out anyways?

But agreed, I use my mini pump to top off a tire if it's low froma slow leak. If the tire is FLAT, that takes forever and it's exhausting to do with a tiny pump, so I blast it with a CO2 to get the tire most of the way there.

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15 hours ago, mack_turtle said:

I've only used a CO2 cartridge to use it all. What happens if you stop partway and leave the inflator screwed on and put it away? Does it slowly leak out anyways?

But agreed, I use my mini pump to top off a tire if it's low froma slow leak. If the tire is FLAT, that takes forever and it's exhausting to do with a tiny pump, so I blast it with a CO2 to get the tire most of the way there.

I’ve had a partly used CO2 screwed to the head that was good months later.

For long unsupported mtb or gravel rides I bring two tubes and patches.  I’ve patched on the trail but that was before sealant.  I also bring a derraileur hanger for rides like LGT.  A spare valve stem, cleat, and zip ties also go in my pack.  I keep my old quick links in a zip lock in case someone needs one.  In fact I keep tubes and links in my car in case I see someone on the road with a flat. 
 

I’ve BTDT with the strapped tube being rotted out.  It sucks.

BTW, I patch tubes at home.  Please don’t throw your tubes away.  I will patch them and I’ve given them away as well.  I bought a 100 patch kit and five tubes of glue so I need to use them up before the glue and patches dry up.

Edited by AntonioGG
clarify valve stem
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