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rank trails in order of heat stroke danger


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So even though you're replacing like for like you can still deduct it?

 

We're also in a remodeling (our permit finally got approved on Tuesday!!) and because of where we live, we have a lot of firewise improvements (some requirements for the new patio roof/screen, some I just want to do now that I know about them.)

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Yep. It’s basis, all money added in. On a home you can’t deduct it as you dispose of old cost so new cost just adds into basis. The only thing you back out is money collected from insurance. I.e.  your “basis for gain” is  net out of pocket costs on purchasing plus improvements over the life of property. 
 

And all those last minute out of pocket things you do to list it, cleaning supplies & equipment, paint, plants, photography,  etc. are “closing costs” like real estate commission, title fees, etc. All that counts o reduce gain. 

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9 minutes ago, cmc4130 said:

I got heat stroke in Bentonville’s “Back 40” in June last year. The humidity was worse than here. 

Can confirm.

 

Buddy of mine from Utah and I did that trail in may of 2017.  The heat/humidity was too much for him and he was freaking out saying that he couldn't cool off and was getting sick.

Welcome to hell 😆

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I had some friends in town from Denver 2 weeks ago and I thought we were gonna have to Heli one guy out in the back of the GB. Luckily made it to Deep Eddy pool to cool down but it was quite a situation. Also a Pool Burger helped! This heat aint messin around.

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I know a few people who can ride for hours in blazing heat. I don't know how they do that. Must be genetic or many hours of intensional training to allow the body to do that. Until I can get out of this hellhole, I think the only answer is to keep my rides under 90 minutes.

I wear a 3L pack and two 24 ounce water bottles on these hot days, one of the bottles is filled with one of the many electrolyte mixes I have tried. I "camel up" the day before by drinking as much water as I can stand, combined with supplements. after 90 minutes, my water is totally depleted and I start to get a headache. this has been going on for a decade with no relief. I asked my doctor and he said "drink some Gatorade."

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22 hours ago, cmc4130 said:

I got heat stroke in Bentonville’s “Back 40” in June last year. The humidity was worse than here. 

Did you seriously have heat stroke or was it heat exhaustion? Neither is good of course but from what I understand heat stroke can be life threatening. In any case, I hope you fully recovered. The closest I came I think was pushing myself real hard on the greenbelt mid-day in May a few years back. My legs were literally seizing up riding on the pavement to get back to the car. I ended up drinking a gallon or so of melted ice from my cooler in an attempt to recover, but I've really never been the same since when it comes to riding in the heat - so I just don't (or at least don't push myself).   

We rode Back 40 mid-May this year and I was thinking that was about as late in the year I'd ever want to ride there. There was a cooler full of ice-cold drinks on the trail near the end of our ride that came in handy. 

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1 hour ago, mack_turtle said:

I know a few people who can ride for hours in blazing heat. I don't know how they do that. Must be genetic or many hours of intensional training to allow the body to do that. Until I can get out of this hellhole, I think the only answer is to keep my rides under 90 minutes.

I wear a 3L pack and two 24 ounce water bottles on these hot days, one of the bottles is filled with one of the many electrolyte mixes I have tried. I "camel up" the day before by drinking as much water as I can stand, combined with supplements. after 90 minutes, my water is totally depleted and I start to get a headache. this has been going on for a decade with no relief. I asked my doctor and he said "drink some Gatorade."

I've pretty much been one of those guys.  Born and raised here in TX and I quite like the heat.  To be fair once the thermometer gets above 96-97* it becomes less bearable.  But, I was dropped off yesterday after work at Suburban Ninja (at 4:15pm) and rode 3.5hrs of trail and street all way back to my house near WC.  Not once did I think to myself if was overly hot or I should not have been doing it.  In fact, I only had 3 water bottles with me.  Admittedly I was a little under-watered by the end and wish I had consumed one more during my ride.  But I'm all-good today.

Later,
CJB

 

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Posted (edited)

You must be one of those Lizard People that Alex Jones has been warning us about! 

I don't want to find out the hard way, but I'm pretty sure I would find myself in the ER if I tried that. I keep my thermostat set at 78 at home and spending the latter half of my life in Texas does not seem to help. Maybe that internal thermostat gets set earlier in life.

Edited by mack_turtle
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11 minutes ago, mack_turtle said:

You must be one of those Lizard People that Alex Jones has been warning us about! 

 

Funny you say that, because I mention to my wife I think I have 'lizard blood'.  Many times during the cooler weather months, once the sun comes out and shines on our trampoline, my wife will find me out on the trampoline literally sunning myself.  It just makes me happy.  I truly abhor the cold weather months when I have to roll out from the (warm) house into the cold temps wearing not much more than spandex & arm warmers.

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2 hours ago, CBaron said:

Funny you say that, because I mention to my wife I think I have 'lizard blood'.  Many times during the cooler weather months, once the sun comes out and shines on our trampoline, my wife will find me out on the trampoline literally sunning myself.  It just makes me happy.  I truly abhor the cold weather months when I have to roll out from the (warm) house into the cold temps wearing not much more than spandex & arm warmers.

I was the same way when I lived in Salt Lake City and would fly to Orange County in the dead of winter. 60* never felt so good😁

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I used to be able to ride in the heat, my record was 110F on the greenbelt once.

But this year I donated blood and my body was out of whack. Can't ride in the heat. Hoping by the time I get back from Chicago my blood cells will be back in order and I can ride in heat again.

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6 hours ago, CBaron said:

I truly abhor the cold weather months when I have to roll out from the (warm) house into the cold temps wearing not much more than spandex & arm warmers.

I've never been one of those "ride cold for the first 20 minutes and you'll warm up." 

Put on everything you own, ride until you feel like a hog in a sauna, and then start dropping layers as needed.  A riding jacket with zip off sleeves works well in this regard.   

Edited by June Bug
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I'm on a quest to buy some loose fitting long-sleeve summer riding shirts now. I don't think much exists in cycling-specific clothing that fits the bill. I draw the line at those awful dorktastic Columbia "fishing" shirts, but I might have to do that.

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11 hours ago, AustinBike said:

I used to be able to ride in the heat, my record was 110F on the greenbelt once.

I don't mind the heat. My record is 120F at Palo Duro Canyon. But it's a dry heat!

Image

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And it might be genetic. Somebody mentioned they didn't sweat much so riding in the heat was difficult. I don't have a problem sweating! The problem is in those high heat/low humidity situations is that you don't feel yourself sweating so you forget to drink enough. Played golf in Las Vegas when it was 118. Had to force myself to remember to drink water.

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The Columbia cooling shirts are awesome. I wear one for gardening.  For cycling I wear pearl Izumi cooling/SPF sleeves.  They feel like air conditioning.  I also wear a cooling beanie under my helmet.  The right shirt/jerseys make a huge difference.  I pretty much do not wear my specialized shiny material jerseys.  They suck in the heat.
 

its 100% about evaporation as far as cooling the core.  If it is humid and you are doing a high effort, it doesn’t matter if it’s 70F.  I was also in Bella Vista last June and I did one early ride and it was hell.  The rest of the days I rode in the afternoon and that was way more comfortable.  
 

it takes me about 2 weeks of at least 3 rides (or activity outdoors) of 1+ hours outside (or in the garage) before I feel comfortable in 100+ degrees, but for sure sweat, humidity and airflow is key.  I rode on Wednesday from mid town to my house in NW Balcones at 2:30pm, and the only time I was uncomfortable was on the westbound Steck MOPaC to Mesa climb, and the Raincreek climb.  But I know how long those are and it’s a matter of getting my mind straight.

Unless you’re pounding salt with your water when you want to camel up, you are actually making the problem worse by leaching out sodium (and then other minerals which your body will resort to for osmotic balance if you are too depleted of sodium.)

if you sweat enough you should be able to find a balance between drink, effort, airflow to be able to endure in reasonable* conditions.  Try this:  weigh yourself before a hot ride.  Ride 1hr.  Weigh yourself after.  Figure out how much you drank.  2.2lbs = 1 liter.  Go back out drinking at the same rate.  Ride for 1hr and then weigh yourself again.  You’ll probably see your loss for the first hour is way worse than your loss for the second hour.

gatorade is shit as far as having enough sodium for Texas summer.

different foods can have a dramatic effect. I find bbq or Chinese food will have me retaining more water.  If you’re eating only homemade foods and you cycle in the heat, you may need a lot more salt in your food or drink.

* reasonable to me is when the minimal effort, and speed plus humidity results in evaporation, if the sweat is just dripping off you at the lowest effort, it’s time to head back indoors.

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I work outside 5 days a week, in direct sunlight and just wear cotton shorts, t-shirt and a boonie hat. No matter what you wear, it's going to be miserable outside. I have switched shoes to some fiveten sleuth mesh slipons that breathe well and that seemed to help some.  

When it comes to hydration, I only drink water, and have been pounding the HEB 1877 mineral water. Used to drink topo until i found out how much pollution was in it (thanks coke). Wont touch sports drinks as the artificial flavoring makes me sick after a bottle or two. IMHO, no chemical that tastes that sweet but has no sugar is worth consuming. If im going to get sick from drinking, it'll come from booze.

@mack_turtle For riding in the sun, i've had luck with LS jerseys from Forbike. They used make commencal's clothing, and I got some for christmas a couple years ago. They are euro so they fit a little tighter which made it tough for use over armor but worked great for just casual riding. 

https://www.forbikeclothing.com/en/

 

Housing market is cooling here so may be here further into summer than I'd like. Not great.

 

Edited by ATXZJ
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Working stationary or semi stationary outside and riding a bike at some speed are different things.  For sure I’m not going to do technical MTB or hill repeats in this heat.  I will ride flat stuff and or shady stuff.  Think a ride into Leander/cedar park on the road or suburban ninja off road (shady and fast) and staying away from the Greenbelt, quarter notch, and for sure thumper.  
 

I’m not disputing no clothes will make you comfortable in this heat, but I can tell you for my gardening/landscaping wearing a cotton tee that becomes saturated in sweat and thus becomes a perfect wind block is very different than wearing a technical t-shirt which is designed to wick that moisture.

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22 hours ago, AustinBike said:

.... I notice is that when it get really hot, my sweat smells like either vinegar or bleach.

Me too, my Big Sweat is just nasty, doesn't matter how well I'm balancing electrolyte input. Also makes it really hard to truly clean my backpack after it's absorbed a month or so of rides. Yuck.

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17 hours ago, AntonioGG said:

 

I’m not disputing no clothes will make you comfortable in this heat, but I can tell you for my gardening/landscaping wearing a cotton tee that becomes saturated in sweat and thus becomes a perfect wind block is very different than wearing a technical t-shirt which is designed to wick that moisture.

Totally agree on the wicking but once im hot, all bets are off. My only focus is to work as quickly and efficiently as possible to get out of the heat. Clothing material is secondary. I do use a large golf umbrella with a suction cup to work under when possible.

 

Funny you guys mentioned sweat smell. A couple of years ago I stopped used deodorant/anti-perspirant during the week, and have since developed a mild allergy to it. Luckily i work alone and don't sweat or stink too bad so its not an issue during the day. At night when we go out, I'll use deodorant and then wake up with itchy pits in the middle of the night. Have since switched to some all natural fragrance free roll on deodorant, and that seems to be fine but i still sweat.

Bottom line is it has just become too hot for too long here in Austin, and it's getting worse every year. The apocalyptic droughts in the west also have us rethinking living there😬

Edited by ATXZJ
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