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Debo

Riding Etiquette

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Posted (edited)

Am I the only one who gets pissed off when on coming riders don't even attempt to slow down or move over?  When I see oncoming traffic on the trail I always slow down to make sure everyone can pass each other safely. I'm noticing this becoming a trend on the SATN- rode on the 31st with my buddy and out of the 5 encounters we had with oncoming bikers, 1 made an attempt to slow down when we did.  What's the rule, higher ratio of spandex commands ROW?

Edited by Debo
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Posted (edited)

100% situation dependent on the trail pitch where you meet, who can afford space to yield in that moment, and who wants to. If I am approaching a rider and she/ he veers off the trail to let me pass before I have the chance to do the same, I just pass and say something pleasant. If I notice the other rider first, I give them space. It's a give and take dynamic. On some days, I end up not stopping for anyone. On others, I end up stopping to yield ROW to everyone.

Edited by mack_turtle
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This has come up a few times and I'm always torn. Traditionally, downhill yields to the uphill. This is easy when hiking but I find it harder to put into practice on a MTB. I was just recently in the situation and had I stopped going down I probably would have slid out and maybe right into the oncoming rider. I usually conclude with have a nice day and how many people are riding in my group. 

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In some situations, the downhill pointed rider yielding to one going up is impossible to do safely. That's a silly old rule that needs to die because it cannot be adhered to consistently.

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5 minutes ago, notyal said:

First to make eye contact loses.

In that case, I make an effort to lose every trail interaction, then. 

For the most part, I try to adhere to the "uphill has right of way" rule. But as has been pointed out, there are situations where it just doesn't make sense. And it's also the case that around these parts, and especially in SATN, it is just as likely that the trail interaction will be on a flat AF trail, so that rule is moot anyway. 

The only rule that always works is, "don't be a dick." Unfortunately there are people--even among mountain bikers!-- who find that particular rule impossible to follow. I'm personally no stranger to some head-down hammering, but even in those situation, I try to acknowledge all other trail users and make a judgement each time about who it makes more sense to yield. Much like the OP, I'm quite surprised any time another trail user wholly ignores me and others (even when directly addressed) and just head-down plows by the trail interaction. 

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Posted (edited)

A couple years ago I was riding south on Bambi (I think it's Bambi... The trail north of Slaughter and east of Mopac, south of Convict)... Anyway... There's a wide corner that is blocked by bush. I heard what I thought was a rider approaching so I pulled to the inside of the corner, away from where a rider coming the other way would naturally go if going fast. And yep... There was a rider... And the kid was going fast... Very fast. I think I scared him as when he came into the corner he looked up at me and lost his line. Thankfully he recovered, not falling. But he just kept booking it down the trail... Said nothing to me. Then came a second rider... Another kid... Going fast, but not as fast. He was a bit more polite and acknowledged that I'd pulled aside for him. But honestly... This was a weekday late afternoon, and both were going too fast for that section of the trail... There are hikers who walk there all the time.

These youngsters, unless checked by their parents — or worse, an accident — will just continued to ride this way.

Edited by RidingAgain

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Meh, I haven't had many bad trail interactions, but I've had more poor interactions with adults than with yoots. 

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11 minutes ago, Barry said:

Meh, I haven't had many bad trail interactions, but I've had more poor interactions with adults than with yoots. 

"A Yoot?"

(because I know Barry is just waiting for this) 🙂

 

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Posted (edited)

Yoots will be yoots... That's a done deal. The yoot's parents (hopefully adults) need to help them better understand their actions, and possible consequences of their actions.

But overall... When the amount of miles/time spent on the bike/trail is considered... These interactions are minimal... Unfortunately though, it only takes one to have possible dire consequences.

Edited by RidingAgain

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All my situations didn't involve an uphill/downhill dynamic, and if any of them even bothered to say anything I probably wouldn't have been pissed.  I always make a point to say hello and thank another rider when they slow down/yield.  Just irks me when someone thinks their that damn important.  But I stand firm on my Spandex/Lycra ratio hypothesis, most of the guys being impolite are decked out in it.

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4 minutes ago, Debo said:

All my situations didn't involve an uphill/downhill dynamic, and if any of them even bothered to say anything I probably wouldn't have been pissed.  I always make a point to say hello and thank another rider when they slow down/yield.  Just irks me when someone thinks their that damn important.  But I stand firm on my Spandex/Lycra ratio hypothesis, most of the guys being impolite are decked out in it.

I make it a point to greet everyone. No reason to be an ass, especially when you're doing something you love.

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Just now, TheX said:

I make it a point to greet everyone. No reason to be an ass, especially when you're doing something you love.

Like I mentioned, I'm always surprised when I'm wholly ignored by a rider. And the more extreme the biking situation, the more surprising. I'm on the road and don't get a nod from a roadie going the other direction on a 4 lane? No huge surprise. But if me and a buddy are doing a 4C night ride in mid January, and we see one fellow out there that snubs us both? Well that's just odd. I mean, it ain't nuthing to get mad about unless it leads to a poor or unsafe trail interaction, but it's odd. 

 

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Depends on the situation for me but if possible I will move over or yield to the oncoming rider or riders.

Sent from my moto g(6) using Tapatalk

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Situation dependent.

Maybe the slower person should yield?

Maybe the group with less riders should yield?

Maybe the person that has the most off trail space should yield?

The determining logic being that whoever will have the easier time yielding should yield.

That's why in reality hikers usually step off the trails for us even though we know that we are suppose to yield to hikers. It's a lot easier for them to simple take a step sideways than for us to find a place to pull over, stop, dismount, and then start up again.

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I tend to move over for other riders, I'm not a KOM chaser, and I'm not in a hurry.

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My ride Kit is a suit and tie, and carry a book with me. People usually go the opposite direction.

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6 hours ago, notyal said:

First to make eye contact loses.

Same rules as driving in NYC, or Paris.  Rental cars with corporate coverage are awesome.

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45 minutes ago, AntonioGG said:

Same rules as driving in NYC, or Paris.  Rental cars with corporate coverage are awesome.

And rental cars in Paris? Definitely overpay for their coverage. Learned the hard way that the Amex coverage does not cover tires and BMW M-class tires are expensive and must be bought in pairs 😉

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Posted (edited)

Got jacked up pretty good in a head-on collision at WC several years ago. One of the worst things that ever happened to me on a trail. Some dickweed wearing headphones was blasting down a descent leading to the creek crossing as I was climbing out. Never saw him till too late.  Here’s a few suggestions to avoid that sort of violence.  1. Get a trail bell and ring that bitch on blind spots. 2. Go off the grid on weekends if you know what I mean. 3. Either lose the earbuds or turn that shit way down. 4. Save your KOM douchebaggery for a day when very few people are riding. If you want to race then sack up and compete head to head.

I hope no one has to experience what happened to me that day. Still think about it on the rare occasion I ride that trail. Bottom line.....be safe and yield every chance you get.  

Edited by Docscotty

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18 hours ago, notyal said:

First to make eye contact loses.

First to break eye contact loses!

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